Pentecost +8, Year C

Musical Reflection
Sisters of Mercy by Serena Ryder

 

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Invocation

God of bandit places,
love that demands our all:
reveal to us our wounds
and give us grace
to know our neighbour,
tending us
with foreign hands;
through Jesus Christ, who crossed over for us.

Amen.

First Reading
The Quality of Mercy

by William Shakespeare

The quality of mercy is not strain’d.
It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
Upon the place beneath. It is twice blest:
It blesseth him that gives, and him that takes.
‘Tis mightiest in the mightiest; it becomes
The throned monarch better than his crown.
His scepter shows the force of temporal power,
The attribute to awe and majesty,
Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings;
But mercy is above this sceptered sway;
It is enthroned in the heart of kings;
It is an attribute to God himself;
And earthly power doth then show likest God’s
When mercy seasons justice.

Second Reading
“The Mercy”
by Philip Levine

The ship that took my mother to Ellis Island
Eighty-three years ago was named “The Mercy.”
She remembers trying to eat a banana
without first peeling it and seeing her first orange
in the hands of a young Scot, a seaman
who gave her a bite and wiped her mouth for her
with a red bandana and taught her the word,
“orange,” saying it patiently over and over.
A long autumn voyage, the days darkening
with the black waters calming as night came on,
then nothing as far as her eyes could see and space
without limit rushing off to the corners
of creation. She prayed in Russian and Yiddish
to find her family in New York, prayers
unheard or misunderstood or perhaps ignored
by all the powers that swept the waves of darkness
before she woke, that kept “The Mercy” afloat
while smallpox raged among the passengers
and crew until the dead were buried at sea
with strange prayers in a tongue she could not fathom.
“The Mercy,” I read on the yellowing pages of a book
I located in a windowless room of the library
on 42nd Street, sat thirty-one days
offshore in quarantine before the passengers
disembarked. There a story ends. Other ships
arrived, “Tancred” out of Glasgow, “The Neptune”
registered as Danish, “Umberto IV,”
the list goes on for pages, November gives
way to winter, the sea pounds this alien shore.
Italian miners from Piemonte dig
under towns in western Pennsylvania
only to rediscover the same nightmare
they left at home. A nine-year-old girl travels
all night by train with one suitcase and an orange.
She learns that mercy is something you can eat
again and again while the juice spills over
your chin, you can wipe it away with the back
of your hands and you can never get enough.


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Gospel Reading
Luke 10:25-37

A legal expert stood up to test Jesus. “Teacher,” he said, “what must I do to gain eternal life?”

Jesus replied, “What is written in the Law? How do you interpret it?”

He responded, “You must love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your being, with all your strength, and with all your mind, and love your neighbour as yourself.”

Jesus said to him, “You have answered correctly. Do this and you will live.”

But the legal expert wanted to prove that he was right, so he said to Jesus, “And who is my neighbour?”

Jesus replied, “A man went down from Jerusalem to Jericho. He encountered thieves, who stripped him naked, beat him up, and left him near death. Now it just so happened that a priest was also going down the same road. When he saw the injured man, he crossed over to the other side of the road and went on his way. Likewise, a Levite came by that spot, saw the injured man, and crossed over to the other side of the road and went on his way. A Samaritan, who was on a journey, came to where the man was. But when he saw him, he was moved with compassion. The Samaritan went to him and bandaged his wounds, tending them with oil and wine. Then he placed the wounded man on his own donkey, took him to an inn, and took care of him. The next day, he took two full days’ worth of wages and gave them to the innkeeper. He said, ‘Take care of him, and when I return, I will pay you back for any additional costs.’ What do you think? Which one of these three was a neighbour to the man who encountered thieves?”

Then the legal expert said, “The one who demonstrated mercy toward him.”

Jesus told him, “Go and do likewise.”

 

Musical Reflection
Mercy Now by Mary Gauthier

 

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 Prayer
by William Temple, adapted

 

O God of love, we pray thee to give us love:
Love in our thinking, love in our speaking,
Love in our doing, and love in the hidden places of our souls;
Love of our neighbours near and far;
Love of our friends, old and new;
Love of those with whom we find it hard to bear,
And love of those who find it hard to bear with us;
Love of those with whom we work,
And love of those with whom we take our ease;
Love in joy, love in sorrow;
Love in life and love in death;
That so at length we may dwell with thee,
Who art eternal love. 
Amen.

The Lord’s Prayer

Dear One, closer to us than our own hearts, farther from us than the most distant star, you are beyond naming.

May your powerful presence become obvious not only in the undeniable glory of the sky, but also in the seemingly base and common processes of the earth.

Give us what we need, day by day, to keep body and soul together, because clever as you have made us, we still owe our existence to you.

We recognize that to be reconciled with you, we must live peaceably and justly with other human beings, putting hate and bitterness behind us.

We are torn between our faith in your goodness and our awareness of the evil in your creation, so deliver us from the temptation to despair.

Yours alone is the universe and all its majesty and beauty.

So it is, Amen.

 

 

 

Blessing

God, our passionate life,
we bless you for the infinite beauty of created things –
sand, wind, wave, and the wings of the eagle –
for the love of land and people,
for the vine and the fruit and the good wine.
We bless you for the endurance of hope,
for the promise of renewal,
and for fleeting moments on the mountaintop.
Blessed are you, God, our passionate life.

May the blessing of God – the Creative Idea, the Creative Energy,
and the Creative Power
,
be with us and remain with us always. Amen.

 

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Sources:

Artwork by AwetikÊ» Abeghay

Invocation from Prayers for an Inclusive Church by Steven Shakespeare

Musical Reflection Sisters of Mercy by Serena Ryder

Poem The Quality of Mercy by William Shakespeare

Poem “The Mercy” by Philip Levine

Musical Reflection Mercy Now by Mary Gauthier

Prayer by William Temple

Lord’s Prayer by Jim Burklo

Musical Reflection Mercy by Pilate

Blessing from The Pattern of our Days

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